POPL 2024
Sun 14 - Sat 20 January 2024 London, United Kingdom
Mon 15 Jan 2024 11:00 - 11:22 at Turing Lecture - Session 2 Chair(s): John Wickerson

A compiler bug arises if the behaviour of a compiled concurrent program, as allowed by its architecture memory model, is not a behaviour permitted by the source program under its source model. One might reasonably think that most compiler bugs have been found in the decade since the introduction of the C/C++ memory model. We observe that processor implementations are increasingly exploiting the behaviour of relaxed architecture models. As such, compiled programs may exhibit bugs not seen on older hardware. To account for relaxed hardware we require model-based compiler testing.

While this observation is not surprising, its implications are broad. Compilers and their testing tools will need to be updated to follow hardware relaxations, concurrent test generators will need to be improved, and assumptions of prior work will need revisiting. We explore these ideas using a compiler toolchain bug we reported in LLVM.

(paper-1.pdf)357KiB

PhD Computer Science on Compiler Testing with Relaxed Memory Models, EPSRC iCase Arm-funded award (my opinions are my own).

Mon 15 Jan

Displayed time zone: London change

11:00 - 12:30
Session 2The Future of Weak Memory at Turing Lecture
Chair(s): John Wickerson Imperial College London
11:00
22m
Talk
Weak Memory Demands Model-based Compiler Testing
The Future of Weak Memory
Luke Geeson University College London (UCL)
File Attached
11:22
22m
Talk
On the need for available, functional, and reusable memory models
The Future of Weak Memory
Hernán Ponce de León Huawei Dresden Research Center
11:45
22m
Talk
What we learned from C++ atomics and memory model standardization
The Future of Weak Memory
12:07
22m
Talk
Why Languages Should Preserve Load-Store Order
The Future of Weak Memory
Stephen Dolan Jane Street